This page includes a selection of work around the exploration of universal design for learning as a tier one approach to supporting children with and without disabilities in the inclusive preschool classroom. In the spirit of multiple means of representation, a video clip from CAST is included as a preview to the major tenets of UDL.

PRESENTATIONS

Robbins, S.H., & Winchell, B. (2011, November). Universal design for learning: Transforming theory into practice. Pecha Kucha presentation at the Division for Early Childhood International Conference: National Harbor, MD.

UDL Pecha Kucha Slides

UDL Poster

Robbins, S.H., & Jackson, S. & Gongola, L. (2010, November). Universal design for learning: Supporting social communication skills in inclusive preschool classrooms. Presentation at the National Association for the Education of Young Children National Conference: Anaheim, CA.

UDL for Social Communication Slides

Grisham-Brown, J., Pfeiffer-Fiala, C., Hawkins, S., Robbins, S.H., & Harris, K. (2010, October). Implementing tiered instruction: Universal, targeted, and intentional strategies. Pre-conference session presented at the Division for Early Childhood International Conference: Kansas City, MO.

Tiered Instruction Slides

Pretti-Frontczak, K., Jackson, S., Robbins, S.H., & Shumar, M. (2006, November). Universal design of learning (UDL): Creating inclusive learning environments to meet the needs of all children. Presentation at the National Association for the Education of Young Children Conference, Atlanta, GA.

Introduction to UDL Slides

Robbins, S.H., & Gongola, L. (2009, November). The effects of tiered instruction on preschooler’s social-communication skills. Presentation at the Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence Conference: Columbus, OH.

Tiered Instruction Slides

The Effects of Tiered Instruction on Conversational Turn Taking

During the 2009-2010 school year, I piloted a study examining the effects of tiered instruction on the frequency of conversational turn taking for children with and without disabilities in an inclusive preschool program. The elements of the tiered instructional model included universal design for learning, peer mediated instruction, and milieu teaching. Each child was provided with a different level of intervention based on his/her individual needs. I then conducted the study again during the 2010-2011 school year in a different classroom using an increasing intensity across subjects, single subject research design. Results were variable across children; however, the amount of data collected and variables analyzed will lead to a variety of possibilities for future research and writing.

Graphed child results with overall trend lines

Universal Design for Learning Fidelity Measure